Search

Custom Search

Welcome to My Blogsite

You will find on this blog a collection of my work mostly done in Google SketchUp and Rendered in either Vray for Sketchup, Hypershot, Vray Max, LightUp and Podium.

Download Free Google SketchUp
Download Vray SKetchUp (you need to register in order to download)
Download Podium Evaluation copy Do you want to try Bunkspeed Shot? Click HERE.


Saturday, 26 November 2011

Tutorial: How to model Ifugao Mask in Google SketchUp

I want to share here how I model this mask. This is an Ifugao Mask from the Northern part of Philippines. This will be our reference image in this tutorial.

Photobucket

Step 1: Trace the outline
Trace the outline of th mask, tracing can be faceted. It does not matter.See the image below.

Photobucket

Step 2: Push Pull
After tracing the whole image, we can push pull it with desired height. Tracing images will always have projected texture. If projected texture in not on then right click and tick projected texture.

Photobucket

Step 3: Offset tool
Select the outside boundary of the top face and use the offset tool. (see image below).

Photobucket


Step 4: Autofold
To enable autofold function, select the face and then use the move tool and at the same time press Alt.
 
Photobucket


Step 5: Trace the eyes.
I traced the eye like the below image. Then I created the hole.

Photobucket

Then push  the other part like the below image.
Photobucket

I then move some of the below lines to the upper lines to create some slopes. I did the same thing with the other eye and the mouth.

Photobucket


Step 6. Tracing the nose
Next I traced the nose. (see the image below) 

Photobucket

I push again the whole thing up (see image)
Photobucket

I selected some of the lines (see highlighted lines below)
Photobucket

and move them to the below lines.
Photobucket

Here is so far the model.

Photobucket

Step 7: Tracing the details. 
I traced some of the details and pushed them a bit. now we are ready to subdivide. I would like you to notice the line near the mouth.

Photobucket

This is the subdivided mesh. Notice the abruptness of the subdivision near the mouth. This because there is big area below the mouth and the distance between the edge of the mouth and side is too small. The lines diverged on that area whilst you can see some abruptness.

Photobucket

Next I  added another line. To separate that area with the rest.
Photobucket

Now the subdivision is smoother.
Photobucket

Here is the complete subdivided model
Photobucket

Here is the wireframe

Photobucket

I painted the texture.
Photobucket

Here is the render.
Photobucket

Thursday, 24 November 2011

How to create Pampanga's Lantern using convert lines to tubes and extrude lines along vector

Pampanga, Philippines is known for each giant parol or lantern, the biggest in the world. Since Christmas is coming, I decided to do Christmas models particularly from the Philippines. This model is easy and can be done in multiple approaches. However, I would like to share my workflow especially in using some scripts that automates the steps. I would like to introduce 2 useful scripts; "convert lines to tubes" and "extrude lines along vector" which are both free. HERE is a good place to download them.

Step 1. The model
Here is a 2d model of the parol that I will be modeling.

Photobucket

Step 2: Tracing the Lines
Since we have the reference image, all we need is to trace each lines. I applied semi transparent material so that I can see what I am tracing below. After tracing on part, I will copy and rotate it 4 times.
Photobucket

Here is the finished lines and arcs

Photobucket


Step 3: Convert Lines into tubes
Using the script convert lines into tubes, I will convert the traced lines into cylinders basically.

Photobucket

In order to optimize the number of sides, I only used precision 4 (4 sides)
Photobucket

Here is an image showing the converted lines into tubes.



Photobucket

Close up

Photobucket


Step 4: Copying, mirroring and adding the sides.
I copied the completed face and made it into component. Then I flipped the copy using mirror tool. I added the sides using "extrude line along vector". Again this is a shortcut of doing faces.



Photobucket

Here is the finish model.

Photobucket
Details

Photobucket

Tuesday, 22 November 2011

Monday, 21 November 2011

Tutorial: How to model folded T-shirt in Google SketchUp

Modeling clothing in SketchUp is not difficult at all. Here is a simple quick workflow on how to do it quickly.

One of the best thing in SkechUp is the ability to project the image.

Step 1: Importing reference image.

Photobucket

Step 2: Tracing the outside boundary using line tool
All you have to do is to use line tool and trace the boundary of the Tshirt, then
pulling it with push pull tool.

Photobucket

Step 3. Adding subdivision

To add subdivision, simply copy the bounding edges (not the face) and paste it twice (see the image below)

Photobucket


Step 4: Re-scale the top and bottom face.
Rescale the top and bottom face. Hold the control key so that the scale anchor point will be in the middle.

Photobucket

You can also use round corner "bevel face" by Fredo here.

Step 5: Beveled Faces

Photobucket

Step 6: Paint Projected image
You can now paint the model using projected image option. This is important for tracing the other parts of the T-shirt.

Photobucket



Step 7: Repositioning edges

In the image below, I repositioned some of the lines to follow the contour of shirt.

Photobucket


Step 8: Tracing the neckline

Here I traced the neckline.

Photobucket

Step 9: Push pulling some parts of the neckline

After tracing the neckline and offsetting it, I used push pull tool to add depth and height. Here you can see the different heights without the projected image.

Photobucket

Step 10: Tracing the sleeve
Trace the sleeve and push pull one more time.

Photobucket

Step 11: Reposition again some of the lines

Photobucket

Here is the Raw Model without smoothing. Generally you can even use this with projected image and soften edges. If your model is far from the camera, this is more than enough to fool the viewers eye.

Photobucket

Step 12: Smoothing

For high poly models that you want to use even near the camera, we can further sub-smooth the models. All we need to do it to select the model and subdivide it with 2 iterations.

Photobucket

Here is the result
Photobucket

Step 13: Further sculpting
Once again using the sculpt tool script made by BTM. Download it for free HERE

Photobucket

Photobucket

Here is the finish model

Photobucket

RENDERED VIEWS

Photobucket

Photobucket


Photobucket 



Hope this will encourage you to model and not keep on looking everywhere for models.

Bedroom Interior Rendering

Bedroom Interior Rendering